Spud Trooper

Spud Trooper
Task of the Month:
October, 2019

Assembling a Potato Head Toy is a task that allows the student to work independently using a Work System.

Materials you'll need:

  • Mr. Potato Head Spud Trooper, or adapt this using any Potato Head character of interest to your student.
  • Instructions with pictures

The student can follow adapted instructions given in picture form available here and in the attachment below.

Work systems allow a student to work independently in the classroom and eventually in work settings.

Tasks for work systems should be directly related to a student’s IEP goals. Work systems include preferred and motivating activities.

Use ‘graduated guidance’ if a student requires support while completing a work system task. Briefly, this means providing enough physical guidance to prevent error; reducing this support as the student gains independence. For additional information, refer to Activity Schedules for Children with Autism, Teaching Independent Behaviour by L. McClannahan & P. Krantz (First Edition: 1999, Second Edition: 2010).

AttachmentSize
Assembling Spud Trooper.pdf1.01 MB

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Opening a Combination Lock

Opening a Combination Lock
Task of the Month:
September, 2019

Opening a Combination Lock is a task that allows the student to work independently using a Work System.

Materials you'll need:

  • Combination lock with a 3-digit code.
  • Instructions with pictures and text

Note: this task can be modified for a single digit lock.

The Student can follow directions given in written and picture form available here and in the attachment below.

about work systems

Work Systems allow a student to work independently in the classroom and eventually in work settings.

Please note that tasks for work systems should be directly related to a student's IEP goals. Work systems include preferred and motivating activities.

Use ‘graduated guidance’ if a student requires support while completing a work system task. Briefly, this means providing enough physical guidance to prevent error and reducing this support as the student gains independence.

For additional information, refer to

"Activity Schedules for Children with Autism, Teaching Independent Behaviour" by L. McClannahan & P. Krantz (First Edition: 1999, Second Edition: 2010).

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opening combination lock instructions.pdf605.33 KB

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Match objects by photos

Match objects by photos
Task of the Month:
August, 2019

The goal of this task is for the student to match objects to photos of those objects. This task can be a component of a student’s individualized work system. Matching is a skill required for many other tasks such as putting away laundry or stocking a shelf.

Materials:

  • Everyday objects
  • Photos of the objects
  • Boxes/bins to hold the objects

Setup:

  • Take pictures of the objects the learner will match.
  • Affix a photograph to each of the boxes or bins.
    • Tips:
      • For learners with more advanced symbol representation, try using line drawings rather than photographs.
      • Extend this task by sorting a larger number of objects.
      • This task can become part of a domestic skill such as putting away dishes in the cupboard or putting laundry into drawers.

      Reference:
      This task was adapted from Tasks Galore by Laurie Eckenrode, Pat Fennell, and Kathy Hearsey (2003)

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    Sort Private vs Public

    Sort Private vs Public
    Task of the Month:
    July, 2019

    All children explore their bodies – this is developmentally appropriate. Typical children learn to discriminate between public and private, however, children with disabilities often have little to zero understanding of what behaviour is appropriate in public and what is not (picking nose, touching private parts, scratching, etc.). This task can be used to start teaching public vs. private behaviours and places. Define public as “with others” and private as “by yourself”.

    Materials:

    • Template for sorting
    • Laminated cards of behaviours/places

    Setup:

    • Choose applicable behaviours/places
    • Print and laminate visuals

    Tips:

    • Student should be able to understand the concept “alone” vs. “with others”
    • Include places and behaviours that are relevant to the student and his/her age group
    • Once your student is able to discriminate the differences between two kinds of behaviours and places, use the visuals to pre-load them before going somewhere (e.g., to the restaurant). Visuals of “private” and “public” can also be used as a reminder while out in the community
    • Images taken from Vanderbilt Kennedy Center. For more resources see: kc.vanderbilt.edu/HealthyBodies

    You can download student instructions and sample images from the Attachments area below.

    AttachmentSize
    Student instructions.docx854.45 KB
    Self Check.docx677.93 KB
    Visuals for Private or Public.docx590.08 KB

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    Summer Vacation Memory Game

    Task of the Month:
    June, 2019

    This summer, help your child with autism remember his or her summer holiday through Memory! Whether you’re going on a special trip or enjoying a preferred activity in your community, help document your son’s or daughter’s favourite things so they can later look back and share those details with others!

    Materials needed:
    - Camera
    - 2 printed copies of 12 of pictures taken with the camera
    - Envelope or box for storage

    Steps:
    1. Before leaving for a trip or going out into the community explain to your child that he or she will be the official photographer.
    2. Help your child take photos of his or her favourite sights, activities, and people.
    3. Once home, choose 12 of the photos and develop or print two copies of each photo.
    4. Shuffle and lay out the photos in a 5 x 4 grid with each photo facing down.
    5. Get ready to play the Memory game to help your child uncover the details of the fun they had. Bonus: The structure of the game will provide your child with extra practice turn taking – a foundational social skill!
    6. Once the game is well practiced, you can use it as an activity for play dates – not only will your child practice turn taking with others but can use the pictures to answer questions and remind them of details they can share about their summer with friends.

    **Idea inspired from: http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Summer-Words-MatchingMemory-G...

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    Count Coins and Match to Value

    Get coins.
    Adding coins.
    Putting coins in the envelope.
    Task of the Month:
    May, 2019

    Counting coins and matching to value is a task that could fit within a student’s independent work system.

    Work system tasks are tasks that the student can already do independently, are created to address a variety of levels of functioning, and correspond to a student’s IEP objectives. Work Systems allow a student to work independently in the classroom and eventually in work settings.

    Materials:

    • File folder
    • Envelopes
    • Ziplock bag
    • Variety of coins
    • Student instructions

    Setup: Creating the Folder

    • Glue or tape the envelopes into one side of the open file folder and the ziplock bag to the other side.
    • Write a dollar value (e.g., $ 0.75, $2.00) on the front of the envelopes.
    • Count out enough coins to make each of the dollar values you wrote and put them in the ziplock bag.

    Tips:

    • Vary the number of envelopes and values according to the student’s skill level.
    • Consider occasionally changing the types of coins in the bag so that the student learns to create the values using a different mix of coins (e.g., 2 dimes and a nickel rather than a quarter).
    • Another variation is to write out the dollar values in words (e.g., “One dollar and seventy cents”), use price tags like you might see in a store, or use prices with pictures from flyers.
    AttachmentSize
    Count Coins Student Instructions.pdf317.46 KB

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    Mr. Potato Head

    Mr. Potato Head
    Task of the Month:
    April, 2019

    In this task, the student must follow a visual task analysis to fully assemble Mr. Potato Head. Following visual instructions allows the student to work independently through a multi-step task. Assembling Mr. Potato Head should be motivating for the student.

    Materials:

    • Mr. Potato Head toy
    • Printed picture cards of Mr. Potato Head body parts
    • Folder or basket for materials

    Set up:

    • Print and cut out all Mr. Potato Head body part picture cards
    • Place Mr. Potato Head in student’s work area with no body parts attached
    • Place the visual instructions next to Mr. Potato Head and the body parts

    Tips:

    • Ensure the student has appropriate fine motor control to complete the task without assistance
    AttachmentSize
    Mr. Potato Head pictures.pdf39.85 KB
    Student instructions Mr. Potato Head.pdf360.59 KB

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    Identifying Facial Expressions

    Identifying Facial Expressions
    Task of the Month:
    March, 2019

    Identifying Facial Expression is another task that allows students to work independently using a Work System and is an activity focused on social skill development.

    Materials you'll need are:

    • a folder or piece of thick paper
    • library pockets or envelopes
    • labels, with our without photographs / pictures of facial expressions
    • photographs of familiar and unfamiliar people making each facial expression

    Steps for setting up this task:

    • stick the library pockets on the folder or thick paper
    • label each library pocket with an emotion. Include a picture symbol or photograph if your student/child is not yet a reliable reader
    • leave one folder blank and use it to store the photos
    • take photographs of people making each facial expression; print them and place them in the unlabelled folder/envelope on the board

    The student can follow the directions given in written and picture form available in the attachment below.

    Work Systems allow a student to work independently in the classroom and eventually in work settings.
    Please note that tasks for work systems should be directly related to a student's IEP goals and be able to be independently performed.

    Reference: This task was adapted from Tasks Galore: Literature-Based Thematic Units by Laurie Eckenrode and Pat Fennell (2013).

    AttachmentSize
    Identifying Facial Expressions - student instructions225.38 KB

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    Match Clock Face with Written Time

    Match Clock Face with Written Time
    Match Clock Face with Written Time
    Match Clock Face with Written Time
    Match Clock Face with Written Time
    Task of the Month:
    February, 2019

    The goal of this task is to match clock faces with written times. You can extend this task by writing out the time in words (e.g., “eight o’clock”) or by matching with times of the day (e.g., matching a clock face showing noon to “lunch time”).

    Materials:
    • Cards with clock faces
    • Cards with written times
    • Container
    • Student instructions

    Setup:
    • Fill in the clock faces and make corresponding cards with the times written on them. You may want to consider laminating the cards.
    • Put them in a container (e.g., plastic bin or bag)

    Tips:
    • Start with a few cards to match. As your student becomes proficient, you can increase the number of cards to match to lengthen the amount of time your student remains engaged in this task.
    • This task can be presented in a number of different ways. You can use a Velcro board to help your student organize the cards or use paperclips to hold the pairs together.

    Reference:
    This task was adapted from Tasks Galore by Laurie Eckenrode, Pat Fennell, and Kathy Hearsey (2003)

    AttachmentSize
    instructions for the student154.34 KB
    printable clock faces83.13 KB

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    Making Microwave Popcorn

    Abbreviated steps to making microwave popcorn.
    Task of the Month:
    January, 2019

    The goal of this task is to teach your student to make microwave popcorn. This is a functional skill for a student who likes popcorn and can be extended to preparing other foods in the microwave. This could become a component of a social routine with a peer (e.g., to facilitate sharing and cooperation).

    Materials:

    • Microwave
    • Microwave popcorn
    • Visual schedule
    • Bowl

    Instructions for the teacher:
    1. Present the learner with materials and the visual schedule of steps
    2. Use graduated guidance (see components for details) to prompt the learner to follow any steps that they are not able to do independently.

    Tips:

    • Adjust the steps according to the microwave the student is using.
    • Make sure to monitor your student to insure their safety.
    • Consider using imbedded prompts (e.g., put numbered stickers on the microwave buttons indicating the order of buttons to push).
    • Be sure to fade your prompts to allow the student to complete as much of the task independently as possible.
    • Avoid the use of verbal prompts wherever possible (e.g., verbally stating next step), as these are difficult to fade out. Instead, make reference to the visual schedule and use gestural or physical prompting.

    Graduated Guidance:
    Graduated guidance involves the use of prompts (usually physical) to teach a skill. This involves using just enough guidance to prevent an incorrect response and reducing the intensity of the prompt as the student becomes more independent. For example, starting out with a hand-over-hand prompt, then reducing to a light touch as the student begins to perform the skill independently.

    References:
    Neitzel, J. & Wolery, M. (2009). Steps for implementation: Graduated guidance. Chapel Hill, NC: The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders, FPG Child Development Institute, The University of North Carolina.
    McClannahan, L. E. & Krantz, P. (2010). Activity schedules for children with autism, teaching independent behavior. Woodbine House

    AttachmentSize
    student instructions.pdf15.81 MB

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