Opening a Combination Lock

Opening a Combination Lock
Task of the Month:
November, 2018

Opening a Combination Lock is a task that allows the student to work independently using a Work System.

Materials you'll need:

  • Combination lock with a 3-digit code.
  • Instructions with pictures and text

Note: this task can be modified for a single digit lock.

The Student can follow directions given in written and picture form available here and in the attachment below.

about work systems

Work Systems allow a student to work independently in the classroom and eventually in work settings.

Please note that tasks for work systems should be directly related to a student's IEP goals. Work systems include preferred and motivating activities.

Use ‘graduated guidance’ if a student requires support while completing a work system task. Briefly, this means providing enough physical guidance to prevent error and reducing this support as the student gains independence.

For additional information, refer to

"Activity Schedules for Children with Autism, Teaching Independent Behaviour" by L. McClannahan & P. Krantz (First Edition: 1999, Second Edition: 2010).

AttachmentSize
opening combination lock instructions.pdf605.33 KB

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Spud Trooper

Spud Trooper
Task of the Month:
October, 2018

Assembling a Potato Head Toy is a task that allows the student to work independently using a Work System.

Materials you'll need:

  • Mr. Potato Head Spud Trooper, or adapt this using any Potato Head character of interest to your student.
  • Instructions with pictures

The student can follow adapted instructions given in picture form available here and in the attachment below.

Work systems allow a student to work independently in the classroom and eventually in work settings.

Tasks for work systems should be directly related to a student’s IEP goals. Work systems include preferred and motivating activities.

Use ‘graduated guidance’ if a student requires support while completing a work system task. Briefly, this means providing enough physical guidance to prevent error; reducing this support as the student gains independence. For additional information, refer to Activity Schedules for Children with Autism, Teaching Independent Behaviour by L. McClannahan & P. Krantz (First Edition: 1999, Second Edition: 2010).

AttachmentSize
Assembling Spud Trooper.pdf1.01 MB

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Sorting: Refrigerator vs Pantry

Sorting: Refrigerator vs Pantry
Task of the Month:
August, 2018

Sorting is a foundation skill for any student and students with ASD may require additional practice. Once the student has learned object identification and sorting, independent practice helps maintain these skills, and can be generalized in work settings.

This task will provide our students the opportunity to stock the shelves at home and/or work at a grocery store in the community:

  • The student is required to sort all food items into categories using work systems.
  • Work systems provide students with structure and routine which promotes independence.
  • Materials

    • Food pictures (ex: meat, milk, and crackers) printed and Velcro
    • 1 bag for materials
    • 1 Folder for sorting
    • Task analysis for student directions, attached below

    Setup

    • Print and cut out all food picture cards
    • Have student open bag, take all pictures, and sort each based on if the items needs to be refrigerated or not.
    • Student can follow a task analysis. An example of this is attached below.

    Tips

    • Only use prompts to promote errorless learning. The focus of using work systems are for the student to complete the tasks independently.
    • Work systems should incorporate grade level, functional, and IEP goals.

    For additional information, refer to this scholarly article:
    http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/004005990904100401?journalCo...

AttachmentSize
Fridge Pantry Sort Student Instructions.docx184.39 KB
Sample pictures.docx686.91 KB

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Mr. Potato Head

Mr. Potato Head
Task of the Month:
July, 2018

In this task, the student must follow a visual task analysis to fully assemble Mr. Potato Head. Following visual instructions allows the student to work independently through a multi-step task. Assembling Mr. Potato Head should be motivating for the student.

Materials:

  • Mr. Potato Head toy
  • Printed picture cards of Mr. Potato Head body parts
  • Folder or basket for materials

Set up:

  • Print and cut out all Mr. Potato Head body part picture cards
  • Place Mr. Potato Head in student’s work area with no body parts attached
  • Place the visual instructions next to Mr. Potato Head and the body parts

Tips:

  • Ensure the student has appropriate fine motor control to complete the task without assistance
AttachmentSize
Mr. Potato Head pictures.pdf39.85 KB
Student instructions Mr. Potato Head.pdf360.59 KB

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Sorting Emotions

Task of the Month:
June, 2018

Sorting is a foundation skill for any student, and students with ASD may require additional practice with social interactions and communications. Once the student has learned emotions and sorting facial expressions, independent practice helps maintain these skills, and can be generalized in other settings. This task will provide our students the opportunity to increase their social interactions and communication skills at home and/or in the community. The student is required to sort all emotions given using work syste Work systems provide students with structure and routine which promotes independence.

Materials you'll need are:

  • Emotion pictures (e.g., sad, happy, and angry) printed and Velcro
  • 1 bag for materials
  • 1 folder for sorting
  • Task analysis for student directions (if needed)

Setup:

  • Print and cut out all emotion picture cards
  • Have student open bag, take all pictures, and sort each based off the correct emotion.
  • Student can follow a task analysis. An example of this is attached below.

Tips:

  • Only use prompts to promote errorless learning. The focus of using work systems are for the student to complete the tasks independently.
  • Work systems should incorporate grade level, functional, and IEP goals. .

For additional information, refer to this scholarly article:
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/004005990904100401?journalCo...

AttachmentSize
student_instructions.docx171.94 KB

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Sorting Utensils

Sorting Utensils
Task of the Month:
May, 2018

Sorting is a foundation skill for any student and students with ASD may require additional practice.
Once the student has learned object identification and sorting, independent practice helps maintain these skills, and can be generalized in work settings. This task will provide our students the opportunity to unload a dishwasher at home and/or work at a restaurant in the community.

Introduction:
- The student is required to sort all utensils given using work systems.
- Work systems provide students with structure and routine which promotes independence.

Materials
- Utensil shapes (ex: fork, spoon, and knife) printed and glued separately into each basket
- 1 Bin for materials
- 3 Baskets for sorting
- 1 Ziploc bag for all utensils
- Forks
- Knives
- Spoons
- Task analysis for student directions (if needed)

Set up
- Print and cut out all utensil picture cards
- Arrange picture cards separately in baskets
- Have student open bin, take all utensils, and sort each based off the correct basket.
- Student can follow a task analysis. An example of this is attached below.

Tips
- Only use prompts to promote errorless learning. The focus of using work systems are for the student to complete the tasks independently.
- Work systems should incorporate grade level, functional, and IEP goals.

For additional information, refer to this scholarly article http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/004005990904100401?journalCode=tcxa

AttachmentSize
utensils_student_instructions.docx120.18 KB

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Setting the Table

Setting the Table
Setting the Table
Task of the Month:
April, 2018

Setting the Table
This holiday season help your son or daughter help you! We’ve included two strategies for teaching setting the table; choose the task that best fits your child’s goals and abilities.

Task 1: Matching Objects to Photographs

Materials you’ll need:
Plates and cups in a container, photos of your plates and cups, and a place mat

Steps for setting up this task:

  • Take photos of one plate and one cup that your child will be using to set your table; we recommend using plastic plates and cups.
  • Tape the photos to placemats or to the table in the location where they should be set
  • Place the plates and cups in a basket/box near the table.
  • Have your child choose one item at a time from the basket/box and match each plate and cup to the pictures on the placemats.

Tip: Every student has a different level of symbolic understanding. That means that some students understand that a photograph represents an object. Other students may need to match objects to identical objects or similar, representative objects; others may be able to match objects to pictures, drawings, or even words. You can adapt this activity depending on your child’s level of understanding.

Task 2: Following Directions - Top-to-Bottom Checklists

Often, students have the skills needed to complete a task but may have difficulty organizing the pieces required to complete the task properly. A checklist written in sequential order may be what the student needs to complete the task independently.
Materials you’ll need: Pictorial checklist (pictures can be photos, clip art, or line drawings)

Steps:

  • Organize the items needed to set the table in an area where the student can easily and independently access them.
  • Have your child follow the step-by-step checklist (see attachment below) to set the table; be sure he or she is checking off each of the steps as they are completed.
AttachmentSize
checklist for setting the table.pdf63.44 KB

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Zipping My Coat

Zipping My Coat
Task of the Month:
March, 2018

Zipping My Coat is a task that allows the student to work independently and engage in a social interaction using a Work System.

Materials you'll need:

  • student's coat
  • instructions with pictures and text
  • The student can follow instructions given in written and picture form available in the attachment below.

    Work systems allow a student to work independently in the classroom and eventually in work settings.

    Tasks for work systems should be directly related to a student’s IEP goals. Work systems include preferred and motivating activities.

    Use ‘graduated guidance’ if a student requires support while completing a work system task. Briefly, this means providing enough physical guidance to prevent error; reducing this support as the student gains independence. For additional information, refer to Activity Schedules for Children with Autism, Teaching Independent Behaviour by L. McClannahan & P. Krantz (First Edition: 1999, Second Edition: 2010).

AttachmentSize
Instructions with pictures and text.pdf547.15 KB

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Missing Letters

Missing Letters
Task of the Month:
February, 2018

Given a picture of an object, and two or three letters provided, the student will be able to write in the missing letter to complete the three letter word.

Prerequisite Skills:
Ability to identify various coins and their values. Double-digit addition and subtraction is also needed.

Materials:
-Printing skills, identifying letters, common objects

Tips:
-Begin with preferred items, as the student is more likely to know the item and may have even said the word many times. Then progress to other commonly used items within the students’ environment.

Generalization:
-Use various fonts in the text. Try the task with various instructors. Progress to words larger than 3 letters.

ABLLS-R Code: T4
Skill Level: Primary

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Counting Coins

Task of the Month:
January, 2018

The goal of Counting Coins is for students to count various coins and arrive at a specified amount. The student learns a functional math skill, as well as to work independently from start to finish. The task will also practice fine motor skills while manipulating small coins.

Prerequisite Skills:
Ability to identify various coins and their values. Double-digit addition and subtraction is also needed.

Materials:
Flashcards cut out and blank ones to write your own amounts. Many coins of varying values. A calculator may also be used.

Tips:
-Starting with simple calculations, requiring fewer coins will be best for increasing success and therefore motivation.

Generalization:
-Once the skill is learned, it is important to generalize to the natural environment. This could be a local dollar store, where the student can begin using skills in a functional manner.

ABLLS-R Code: R24
Skill Level: Intermediate

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