Life Skills

Life Skills
Task of the Month:
March, 2017

This month's Task will help students discriminate between non-similar items and learn to assemble items from written directions.

Work Box 1
Objective:
Students will be able to discriminate between non-similar items based on attributes by placing item in the appropriate container.

Materials:

  • 10 pens
  • 10 pencils
  • 10 cap erasers
  • 10 paper clips
  • 4 containers
  • Printed symbols for the containers (Pens, Pencils, Erasers, Paper Clips)

Set-up:
Place all the office supplies in plastic container, mix and place container in front of the student. Place the sorting containers next to the plastic container. Each sorting container should be labeled. Student is finished when all items are sorted.

Work Box 2
Objective:
Students will be able to assemble items from written directions using object discrimination.

Materials:

  • 10 Pens
  • 10 pencils
  • 10 cap erasers
  • 30 paper clips
  • Plastic storage boxes/baggies

Set:Up
Place all the materials in plastic container, mix and place in front of student. Give student one assembly direction visual “order cards”. Student is finished when all the orders are packaged.

AttachmentSize
Life Skills Work Task Box 1.docx285.77 KB
Life Skills Work Task Box 2.docx200.86 KB

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Matching Shapes

Matching Shapes
Task of the Month:
February, 2017

This Flip Book activity is a fun task an elementary student can do independently using a Work System. You can substitute any pictures your student would prefer.

Materials you'll need:

  • binder
  • 2 copies of a picture or scene
  • page protector, laminator or clear packing tape
  • sticky hook & hoop fasteners
  • scissors
  • instructions with pictures & text

To set up the project, please follow the Teacher Instructions below. The student can follow the directions in written and picture form, also in the attachment section below.

Tips:
1. If the student is unable to perform the task independently, use graduated guidance.
2. Be sure to fade your prompts to allow the student to complete as much of the task independently as possible.
3. Increase the number of shapes on each picture and the number of pages in the book as your student is able to perform the task independently.
4. Use pictures of interest to your student to help make it a fun activity!

Graduated Guidance:
Graduated guidance involves the use of prompts (usually physical) to teach a skill. This involves using just enough guidance to prevent an error and reducing the intensity of the prompt as the student becomes more independent. For example, starting out with a hand-over-hand prompt, then reducing to a light touch as the student begins to perform the skill independently.

References:
Neitzel, J. & Wolery, M. (2009). Steps for implementation: Graduated guidance. Chapel Hill, NC: The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders, FPG Child Development Institute, The University of North Carolina.

AttachmentSize
Flip Book Teacher Instructions.pdf35.65 KB
Flip Book student instructions.pdf99.3 KB

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Mr. Potato Head

Mr. Potato Head
Task of the Month:
January, 2017

In this task, the student must follow a visual task analysis to fully assemble Mr. Potato Head. Following visual instructions allows the student to work independently through a multi-step task. Assembling Mr. Potato Head should be motivating for the student.

Materials:

  • Mr. Potato Head toy
  • Printed picture cards of Mr. Potato Head body parts
  • Folder or basket for materials

Set up:

  • Print and cut out all Mr. Potato Head body part picture cards
  • Place Mr. Potato Head in student’s work area with no body parts attached
  • Place the visual instructions next to Mr. Potato Head and the body parts

Tips:

  • Ensure the student has appropriate fine motor control to complete the task without assistance
AttachmentSize
Mr. Potato Head pictures.pdf39.85 KB
Student instructions Mr. Potato Head.pdf360.59 KB

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Animal Sort

Animal Sort
Task of the Month:
December, 2016

Picture identification and sorting are foundational skills for any student, and students with ASD may require additional practice with these early academic skills.
Once the student has learned animal identification and sorting, independent practice helps maintain these skills. In this task, the student is required to sort all animal cards under the correct animal class

Materials:

  • Animal picture cards printed
  • Folder for materials
  • Baskets for sorting

Set up:

  • Print and cut all animal picture cards
  • Arrange animal class pictures in columns or baskets
  • Arrange animal picture cards randomly in student’s work space (i.e., mix up the animal cards)

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Missing Number Trains

Missing Number Trains
Task of the Month:
November, 2016

Early numeracy skills like counting and skip counting provide the basis for math achievement. Students with ASD may require additional practice with early academic skills. Practice filling in the missing numbers on the trains provides additional motivation and practice for the student.

Materials:

  • Missing number train worksheets
  • Pencil
  • Folder for materials
    • Set up

    • Print out missing number train worksheets
    • Place worksheets in “to-do” folder
    • Place a pencil out for student
    AttachmentSize
    Missing number trains.pdf3.98 MB
    Student instructions.docx402.06 KB

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    Colour Word Sort

    Colour Word Sort
    Task of the Month:
    October, 2016

    Sorting is a foundation skill for any student. Students with ASD may require additional practice sorting. Once the student has learned colour identification and sorting, independent practice helps maintain these skills. In this task, the student is required to sort all picture cards according to the colour word.

    Materials:

    • Colour words printed in colour and black
    • Picture cards printed in colour
    • Folder for materials
    • Baskets for sorting

    Set up:

    • Print and cut out all colour words and picture cards
    • Arrange colour words separately in columns or baskets
    • Arrange picture cards randomly in student’s work space (i.e., mix up the coloured cards)

    Tip:
    Once the student successfully sorts the picture cards with the colour word, use colour words printed in black to ensure the student is able to read the colour word.

    AttachmentSize
    Student instructions for colour sort.docx437.82 KB
    colour sort words and pictures.pdf1.17 MB
    colour sort words.pdf1.17 MB

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    Choosing Food at McDonald's

    Choosing Food at McDonald's
    Choosing Food at McDonald's
    Choosing Food at McDonald's
    Choosing Food at McDonald's
    Choosing Food at McDonald's
    Choosing Food at McDonald's
    Task of the Month:
    September, 2016

    The concept of money can be too abstract for students with ASD to fully grasp. Therefore, it might be necessary to teach students a simpler and meaningful way to use money in order to promote independence.

    This task allows students to practice simple money math with items from McDonald’s restaurant. Three options are provided: 2 dollars, 5 dollars and 10 dollars. For each bill, a student is expected to pick items from the mock menu that can be purchased for that amount of money. For example, for 2 dollars, the student may choose a coffee and a muffin or a soft drink.

    Materials:

    • Visual template and menu items
    • Zip lock bag

    Setup:

    • Print and laminate the template and different food items
    • Put Velcro on the squares of the template and the menu items

    Tips:

    • The student needs to be able to do addition and estimation
    • Alternatively, you could teach your student to memorize which items can be bought given each amount of money

    AttachmentSize
    Student Instructions.docx945.92 KB
    McDonald's template.pdf1.38 MB
    Visuals of McDonald's menu items.pdf260.66 KB

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    Dressing for the Weather

    Dressing for the Weather
    Dressing for the Weather
    Dressing for the Weather
    Task of the Month:
    August, 2016

    In order to increase independence, individuals with ASD need to be able to groom and dress themselves. Getting dressed involves both fine and gross motor skills, as well as the ability to choose appropriate clothes for the weather. This task is adapted from Tasks Galore and provides students with extra practice on choosing appropriate clothes.
    Materials:

      • Visuals
      • Zip lock bag, velcro

    Setup:

      • Print and laminate the template, children and clothing items
      • Place all the visuals in a zip lock bag

    Tips:

      • Put Velcro on each season (in order to place child); put Velcro on clothing items as well as on the children to prevent materials from moving
      • Could do one season at a time (place the child in the target season) or practice all seasons
      • Sorting and discrimination between the seasons/clothing are pre-requisite skills

    AttachmentSize
    Clothes and other visuals.doc3.47 MB
    Student instructions.docx1.5 MB

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    Food groups

    Food groups
    Food groups
    Food groups
    Task of the Month:
    July, 2016

    Teaching a student how to prepare a meal is a functional skill. However, before going to the kitchen, it is important to teach a number of pre-requisite skills and necessary vocabulary. One of these skills is an ability to sort foods according to their food group. The task below will focus on sorting foods into different food groups. This task could also be used to promote balanced dietary habits.

    Materials:

    • Sorting template
    • Food visuals

    Setup:

    • Print and laminate the template and different food items
    • Place all the visuals in a zip lock bag

    Tips:

    • Make sure the student can label all of the items
    • Make sure the student is able to sort

    For more information, please go to ChooseMyPlate.gov

    AttachmentSize
    Student instructions_10 food groups.docx835.75 KB
    Foods.docx852.88 KB
    Food groups_template.docx56.25 KB

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    Telling Time

    Task of the Month:
    June, 2016

    Telling time is an abstract concept to learn and may be challenging for students with ASD. However, once acquired, students may show reduction in anxiety due to increased predictability and the opportunity to know when to expect certain events.
    The following task requires student to read time from the digital clock and to represent the same time on the analog clock. In the template “o’clock” and “half past” are included.

    Materials:
    • Digital times and analog clock template
    • Writing supplies

    Setup:
    • Print (laminate optionally for re-use) the templates
    • Cut out the blank analog clock and digital clock
    • Place them in separate zip lock bag to ease the manipulations

    Tips:
    • Teaching time recognition (using both digital and analog clock) is required as a pre-requisite skill before this task can be used in a work systems set up

    AttachmentSize
    digital clock37.15 KB
    analog clock29.41 KB
    student instructions565.37 KB

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