Lego Pattern, Copy & Repeat

Lego Pattern, Copy & Repeat
Task of the Month:
August, 2017

Lego® Sorting (by 2 attributes) is another task that allows students to work independently using a Work System.

Materials you'll need are:

  • set of building blocks with multiple pieces of the same size and colour
  • A small basket and a sandwich baggie

The Student can follow directions given in written and picture form available in the attachment below.

In this task, the student will copy and repeat a starter pattern provided. Students can be given a variety of patterns of varying complexity (e.g. ABC, AAB, ABB, ABA) to copy. For beginners, bricks can be all the same size and vary only by colour. For more advanced learners, bricks can also vary by size and shape.

The Student can follow directions given in written and picture form available in the attachment below.

Work Systems allow a student to work independently in the classroom and eventually in work settings.
Please note that tasks for work systems should be directly related to a student's IEP goals and be able to be independently performed.

AttachmentSize
Lego Patterns Simple Picture instructions.pdf800.11 KB

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Measuring Rice

Measuring Rice
Task of the Month:
July, 2017

Measuring Rice is another task that allows students to work independently using a Work System.

Materials you'll need are:

  • rice in a bag
  • set of measuring spoons
  • cups
  • instructions with pictures and text

The Student can follow directions given in written and picture form available here and in the attachment below.

Work Systems allow a student to work independently in the classroom and eventually in work settings.

Please note that tasks for work systems should be directly related to a student's IEP goals and be able to be independently performed.

AttachmentSize
Measuring Rice instructions.pdf826.53 KB

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Dressing for the Weather

Dressing for the Weather
Dressing for the Weather
Dressing for the Weather
Task of the Month:
June, 2017

In order to increase independence, individuals with ASD need to be able to groom and dress themselves. Getting dressed involves both fine and gross motor skills, as well as the ability to choose appropriate clothes for the weather. This task is adapted from Tasks Galore and provides students with extra practice on choosing appropriate clothes.
Materials:

    • Visuals
    • Zip lock bag, velcro

Setup:

    • Print and laminate the template, children and clothing items
    • Place all the visuals in a zip lock bag

Tips:

    • Put Velcro on each season (in order to place child); put Velcro on clothing items as well as on the children to prevent materials from moving
    • Could do one season at a time (place the child in the target season) or practice all seasons
    • Sorting and discrimination between the seasons/clothing are pre-requisite skills

AttachmentSize
Clothes and other visuals.doc3.47 MB
Student instructions.docx1.5 MB

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Making Microwave Popcorn

Abbreviated steps to making microwave popcorn.
Task of the Month:
May, 2017

The goal of this task is to teach your student to make microwave popcorn. This is a functional skill for a student who likes popcorn and can be extended to preparing other foods in the microwave. This could become a component of a social routine with a peer (e.g., to facilitate sharing and cooperation).

Materials:

  • Microwave
  • Microwave popcorn
  • Visual schedule
  • Bowl

Instructions for the teacher:
1. Present the learner with materials and the visual schedule of steps
2. Use graduated guidance (see components for details) to prompt the learner to follow any steps that they are not able to do independently.

Tips:

  • Adjust the steps according to the microwave the student is using.
  • Make sure to monitor your student to insure their safety.
  • Consider using imbedded prompts (e.g., put numbered stickers on the microwave buttons indicating the order of buttons to push).
  • Be sure to fade your prompts to allow the student to complete as much of the task independently as possible.
  • Avoid the use of verbal prompts wherever possible (e.g., verbally stating next step), as these are difficult to fade out. Instead, make reference to the visual schedule and use gestural or physical prompting.

Graduated Guidance:
Graduated guidance involves the use of prompts (usually physical) to teach a skill. This involves using just enough guidance to prevent an incorrect response and reducing the intensity of the prompt as the student becomes more independent. For example, starting out with a hand-over-hand prompt, then reducing to a light touch as the student begins to perform the skill independently.

References:
Neitzel, J. & Wolery, M. (2009). Steps for implementation: Graduated guidance. Chapel Hill, NC: The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders, FPG Child Development Institute, The University of North Carolina.
McClannahan, L. E. & Krantz, P. (2010). Activity schedules for children with autism, teaching independent behavior. Woodbine House

AttachmentSize
student instructions.pdf15.81 MB

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Cereal Box Math Facts

from www.blog.maketaketeach.com
Task of the Month:
April, 2017

If you have a student who loves puzzles, this is a great activity for you!
All you need is:

  • The front of a cereal box
  • Scissors
  • A marker

Steps:

    1. Cut off the front panel from the cereal box. On the back of the panel (i.e., the side that was inside of the box) draw a vertical line to divide the box into two columns.
    2. Measure evenly spaced horizontal lines to create a grid. The number of rows you create will depend on how many questions or items your student is able to manage at one time. This might range from three to ten or more.
    3. Continuing on the back side of the panel, write the equations in the right column and number them so that the student knows the order in which to lay out the questions. In the left column, write the corresponding answers.
    4. Cut along the lines of the grid to create question cards and answer cards.
    5. Have the student lay out the question cards in vertical order according to how they are numbered, and then match the corresponding answers to the equations. Make sure the answer cards have been shuffled first!
    6. When finished, the student can flip over all of the cards to display the illustrated side of the panel. If the picture on the front of the box looks like it’s supposed to, that shows the student that they have answered all questions correctly! If something looks funny, the student can see that they need to flip the cards over and try again.

An additional benefit of this activity is that it can be easily adapted for various skill levels as well as skill areas. For example, for students working on much more basic math skills, such as number sense, can practice putting number in order from smallest to biggest. Additionally, this same format can be used to develop student vocabulary, by matching words to pictures or even definitions.

References & more information
This task was adapted from the Make, Take & Teach website. Be sure to check out the video demonstration of how to set up this activity provided by Make,Take and Teach.

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Life Skills

Life Skills
Task of the Month:
March, 2017

This month's Task will help students discriminate between non-similar items and learn to assemble items from written directions.

Work Box 1
Objective:
Students will be able to discriminate between non-similar items based on attributes by placing item in the appropriate container.

Materials:

  • 10 pens
  • 10 pencils
  • 10 cap erasers
  • 10 paper clips
  • 4 containers
  • Printed symbols for the containers (Pens, Pencils, Erasers, Paper Clips)

Set-up:
Place all the office supplies in plastic container, mix and place container in front of the student. Place the sorting containers next to the plastic container. Each sorting container should be labeled. Student is finished when all items are sorted.

Work Box 2
Objective:
Students will be able to assemble items from written directions using object discrimination.

Materials:

  • 10 Pens
  • 10 pencils
  • 10 cap erasers
  • 30 paper clips
  • Plastic storage boxes/baggies

Set:Up
Place all the materials in plastic container, mix and place in front of student. Give student one assembly direction visual “order cards”. Student is finished when all the orders are packaged.

AttachmentSize
Life Skills Work Task Box 1.docx285.77 KB
Life Skills Work Task Box 2.docx200.86 KB

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Matching Shapes

Matching Shapes
Task of the Month:
February, 2017

This Flip Book activity is a fun task an elementary student can do independently using a Work System. You can substitute any pictures your student would prefer.

Materials you'll need:

  • binder
  • 2 copies of a picture or scene
  • page protector, laminator or clear packing tape
  • sticky hook & hoop fasteners
  • scissors
  • instructions with pictures & text

To set up the project, please follow the Teacher Instructions below. The student can follow the directions in written and picture form, also in the attachment section below.

Tips:
1. If the student is unable to perform the task independently, use graduated guidance.
2. Be sure to fade your prompts to allow the student to complete as much of the task independently as possible.
3. Increase the number of shapes on each picture and the number of pages in the book as your student is able to perform the task independently.
4. Use pictures of interest to your student to help make it a fun activity!

Graduated Guidance:
Graduated guidance involves the use of prompts (usually physical) to teach a skill. This involves using just enough guidance to prevent an error and reducing the intensity of the prompt as the student becomes more independent. For example, starting out with a hand-over-hand prompt, then reducing to a light touch as the student begins to perform the skill independently.

References:
Neitzel, J. & Wolery, M. (2009). Steps for implementation: Graduated guidance. Chapel Hill, NC: The National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders, FPG Child Development Institute, The University of North Carolina.

AttachmentSize
Flip Book Teacher Instructions.pdf35.65 KB
Flip Book student instructions.pdf99.3 KB

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Mr. Potato Head

Mr. Potato Head
Task of the Month:
January, 2017

In this task, the student must follow a visual task analysis to fully assemble Mr. Potato Head. Following visual instructions allows the student to work independently through a multi-step task. Assembling Mr. Potato Head should be motivating for the student.

Materials:

  • Mr. Potato Head toy
  • Printed picture cards of Mr. Potato Head body parts
  • Folder or basket for materials

Set up:

  • Print and cut out all Mr. Potato Head body part picture cards
  • Place Mr. Potato Head in student’s work area with no body parts attached
  • Place the visual instructions next to Mr. Potato Head and the body parts

Tips:

  • Ensure the student has appropriate fine motor control to complete the task without assistance
AttachmentSize
Mr. Potato Head pictures.pdf39.85 KB
Student instructions Mr. Potato Head.pdf360.59 KB

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Animal Sort

Animal Sort
Task of the Month:
December, 2016

Picture identification and sorting are foundational skills for any student, and students with ASD may require additional practice with these early academic skills.
Once the student has learned animal identification and sorting, independent practice helps maintain these skills. In this task, the student is required to sort all animal cards under the correct animal class

Materials:

  • Animal picture cards printed
  • Folder for materials
  • Baskets for sorting

Set up:

  • Print and cut all animal picture cards
  • Arrange animal class pictures in columns or baskets
  • Arrange animal picture cards randomly in student’s work space (i.e., mix up the animal cards)

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Missing Number Trains

Missing Number Trains
Task of the Month:
November, 2016

Early numeracy skills like counting and skip counting provide the basis for math achievement. Students with ASD may require additional practice with early academic skills. Practice filling in the missing numbers on the trains provides additional motivation and practice for the student.

Materials:

  • Missing number train worksheets
  • Pencil
  • Folder for materials
    • Set up

    • Print out missing number train worksheets
    • Place worksheets in “to-do” folder
    • Place a pencil out for student
    AttachmentSize
    Missing number trains.pdf3.98 MB
    Student instructions.docx402.06 KB

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